The Year of the Hair

Last year about 50% of the guests took the cottage keys home with them.
The year before they forgot to take some of their things with them.
This year is the year of the hair.

Kamisuki (Combing the hair), A colour woodbloc...

Kamisuki (Combing the hair), A colour woodblock print, Japan, Taishō era, 1920 Goyō (1880-1921) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hair, hair, hair, hair, hair
Hair, hair, hair.
Flow it, show it, long as God can grow it, my hair…

It’s the year of long hair in cottage bathrooms.  It is every where en masse. Brushed out and left behind in sinks and in balls on the floor. On shower walls and on mirrors, across toilet tanks and doors.  Hair every where I look.

It ain’t pretty!

The Trouble with Bathroom Accoutrements

Of course you can imagine that we have guests who show up every year like clock work and quite often several times a year.  We love these guests because they feel like family coming to see us.
The following guest blogger Rusty and his wife – Beth – are just such guests.

“When we arrived at Wayfarer Lodgings, we found that our toilet paper holder was taken apart. The rod was sitting on the sink ledge. There was a conspicuous absence of the bathroom product. All we could figure was that Iris was experimenting with a new way to encourage guests to pay upon arrival. No pay-no paper. Since we always pay soon after arrival, this was not a problem for us. Neither of us were dealing with urgent biological issues. We strolled over to the office, paid our due, and requested a couple of rolls of toilet paper. Iris wasn’t sure whether she should be horrified that she had left the situation for us to find, or pleased that she had discovered a way to encourage guests to pay upon arrival.As an aid to our friend Iris, we left two rolls of toilet paper purchased at the local supermarket on the kitchen table. Maybe she had mercy on the guests who followed us.

Rusty”
 

This is not the only thing I forget but it is one of the more important things I forget.  Sometimes it’s the coffee that gets forgotten, sometimes it’s the towels or the soaps but I forget to place enough toilet paper in the cottages most of the time.

I forget so often that Mike once told a guest “If she forgets again, she’ll be fired”.   That guest looked shocked 😯  He thought that he had gotten me into trouble with the boss.  Need I tell you that I am Large Marge in Charge?

😆

And for your amusement another TP story:

Rain – Puddles = Fun!

We had somewhat of a dry spell and very hot days.  Something like 82 degrees for a couple of days in a row and I wilt like an Iris without water 😉

It rained early this morning. Yay!

So here is my little buddy Jude.  Some of you might remember him from an entry here last year.  Well Jude is back and having a great time…

Hmmm, are they looking?

Will I get in trouble?

Nobody’s watching.

The Flying Wallendas

 
The excitement never stops…
Here is what our Frankfort Chamber of Commerce has to tell:

The last of the original Flying Wallendas is soaring high over Benzie County this week.

Carla Wallenda, 76, will carry on her family’s daredevil tradition this week as part of Frankfort’s Fourth of July carnival.
Every night through July 8 she’ll be 110-feet above the ground, teetering and hanging on her “sway pole” – a steel pole that swings and bends as much as 25 feet to either side of the wire.

She is joined by her fellow performers: husband Mike Morgan and grandson Cody Wallenda.

“I’ve been performing all my life,” said Carla, who began walking a wire when she was just 3. “It gets your adrenaline going. You’re out in your own world. No matter what your problems are, when you’re out there, everything leaves you.”

The Flying Wallendas were founded by Carla’s father, Karl, in the 1920s. It’s a dangerous profession, and the family had its share of tragedy through the years. In 1962, her aunt Rietta fell to her death, and Karl died in 1978 when he fell from a wire in Puerto Rico.

Today, different branches of the family carry on the tradition all over the country. Nik Wallenda – Carla’s grand-nephew – recently walked a tightrope over Niagra Falls from the U.S. to Canada.

But Carla was in Clio that day. She watched it on television from her family’s ice cream stand.

“It was just another day at the office for us,” she said. “You can’t make enough money just doing the act any more, so we added the ice cream stand and a couple of games.”

The team spends the winter months in Florida, polishing their act and keeping in shape. Carla performed in nearly every state in the country, but for the past eight or nine years, summer brings her to Michigan to perform at carnivals and festivals around the state.

“I’ve slowed down traveling, between the cost of fuel and me having to drive a truck pulling a 52-foot trailer,” she said.

Carla has no intention of slowing down her act, and she hopes to keep performing for years to come. Meanwhile, she’s helping another generation of Wallendas take to the skies; grandson Cody is in training, and he could be performing the family’s signature “pyramid” act – a double or triple-decker of tight-rope walkers – in the years to come.

But for now, they’re enjoying their time up north.

“We love it here. I’m just enjoying that beautiful lake,” she said.

Frankfort’s Fourth of July Carnival runs today through July 8. Carla said she and her family will be performing every evening.

So, come one, come all and have a great week in Benzie County and Frankfort in particular.
I am happy to announce that the Wayfarer is fully booked